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Hot Gooey Bubble Gum


Marana Rich
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Marana Rich

When I got to work this morning, I saw that I have some pretty thick strings of bubble gum from behind the right rear tire, actually wrapped around the right rear of the car. And this after I spent my obligatory 6 hours cleaning and waxing the car on Saturday.

So the question is, does someone know of a good way of taking bubble gum off of the car. I admit I can't remember ever having to do it. To add to the problem, it is soft gooey mushy stuff, so when you touch it, it spreads.....I don't want to make an easy job hard, so any suggestions are welcome. I know that putting ice on gum will harden it and it can be removed from fabric that way, but a car??

Can we pass a law to shoot all bubblegum chewers if we see them throw their gum out the window?

Rich

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My suggestion would have been ice. If that doesn't work I'd try goo-gone next. That will probably take off any wax too so be prepared to re-wax that panel.

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Final Effort
When I got to work this morning, I saw that I have some pretty thick strings of bubble gum from behind the right rear tire, actually wrapped around the right rear of the car. And this after I spent my obligatory 6 hours cleaning and waxing the car on Saturday.

So the question is, does someone know of a good way of taking bubble gum off of the car. I admit I can't remember ever having to do it. To add to the problem, it is soft gooey mushy stuff, so when you touch it, it spreads.....I don't want to make an easy job hard, so any suggestions are welcome. I know that putting ice on gum will harden it and it can be removed from fabric that way, but a car??

Can we pass a law to shoot all bubblegum chewers if we see them throw their gum out the window?

Rich

I would try Bug & Tar remover or Goo-Gone.

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:agree

either of the 2 above posts would work. Make sure and re-wax when you are done.

Phil... :devil

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WD40 works on most stuff.

WD40 Stoner's Tarminator and if you hit it with a long blast of compressed air in a car it'll harden up the gum (but not in the sunlight when it is 100 friggin degrees out already - try it at night)

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Desertdawg

I was going to suggest a hammer and chisel, but since you said it was gooey then just chuck up a wire wheel in your drill and have at it....

Just Kidding of course.

:leaving

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I too would try ice. It works on most anything to remove gum (especially carpet). :D

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Marana Rich

Thanks for the good advice. I used the two most sensible, i chewed it off, then what I couldn't bite, I used the hammer and chisel, to clean out the grooves. Not too sure that I did it the proper way, so I saved the gum, when we meet again we can put it on your cars. You can then demonstrate to me the proper method of removing.....Here's hoping you both have black ones.

Parking in the garage and waiting to cool off helped. All of the other suggestions were valid. I tried some WD40, and it took it off. I also bought some Turtle Wax bug and tar remover, and it works very well, with some polish added. I did then rewax the whole area, and will check it out in the daylight soon.

My main concern wasn't getting the dam gum off the car, it was could I do it to this paint job without messing it up.

Thanks,

Rich

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Glad to hear it Rich. Catch the mothers and we'll place them before the feet of the almighty "Gum Ball God".

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  • 1 month later...
.....Here's hoping you both have black ones.

Parking in the garage and waiting to cool off helped. All of the other suggestions were valid. I tried some WD40, and it took it off. I also bought some Turtle Wax bug and tar remover, and it works very well, with some polish added. I did then rewax the whole area, and will check it out in the daylight soon.

My main concern wasn't getting the dam gum off the car, it was could I do it to this paint job without messing it up.

Rich

Well....here's how it looks on a black one. :huh

Only good thing is it didn't happen to the 'Vette! :thumbs But I agree with the special place in hell for gum-spitters. :toetap And car keying azzhats too.

Rich, not that you could tell with a red car, but did either of the products you used mess up your paint? :lol

Since WD40 is kerosene, I was thinkin of using the Goo-gone instead. Guess I better get up early and get to work before it turns back to super-gooey. :yesnod

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.....Here's hoping you both have black ones.

Parking in the garage and waiting to cool off helped. All of the other suggestions were valid. I tried some WD40, and it took it off. I also bought some Turtle Wax bug and tar remover, and it works very well, with some polish added. I did then rewax the whole area, and will check it out in the daylight soon.

My main concern wasn't getting the dam gum off the car, it was could I do it to this paint job without messing it up.

Rich

Well....here's how it looks on a black one. :huh

Only good thing is it didn't happen to the 'Vette! :thumbs But I agree with the special place in hell for gum-spitters. :toetap And car keying azzhats too.

Rich, not that you could tell with a red car, but did either of the products you used mess up your paint? :lol

Since WD40 is kerosene, I was thinkin of using the Goo-gone instead. Guess I better get up early and get to work before it turns back to super-gooey. :yesnod

WD40 is fish oil.

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WD40 is fish oil.

Main ingredients, from the material safety data sheet, are:

50%: Stoddard solvent (mineral spirits, also commonly known as dry cleaning solvent)

25%: Liquefied petroleum gas (presumably as a propellant, carbon dioxide is used now to reduce considerable flammability)

15+%: Mineral oil (light lubricating oil)

10-%: Inert ingredients

Maybe the fish is the "inert" :huh:lol

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WD40 is fish oil.

Main ingredients, from the material safety data sheet, are:

50%: Stoddard solvent (mineral spirits, also commonly known as dry cleaning solvent)

25%: Liquefied petroleum gas (presumably as a propellant, carbon dioxide is used now to reduce considerable flammability)

15+%: Mineral oil (light lubricating oil)

10-%: Inert ingredients

Maybe the fish is the "inert" :huh:lol

Depending on what part of the world the fish came from and how polluted the water was, all the above contents may be the fish. :lol:lol

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WD40 is fish oil.

Main ingredients, from the material safety data sheet, are:

50%: Stoddard solvent (mineral spirits, also commonly known as dry cleaning solvent)

25%: Liquefied petroleum gas (presumably as a propellant, carbon dioxide is used now to reduce considerable flammability)

15+%: Mineral oil (light lubricating oil)

10-%: Inert ingredients

Maybe the fish is the "inert" :huh:lol

Well I have one that says it is mostly fish oil. I will bring it home tomorrow and post it. It is at work. :D And it says it will not hurt your cars finish. Works good to clean your hands off. :D

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I know it's some of the best bug and tar remove you can get. When my Wife had the Escape she used to get tar on it regularly and WD40 took it right off. The paint looked new when we traded it.

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My can does not have and "ingredients" list.

First Aid:

CONTAINS PETROLEUM DISTILATES

That's all it says.

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Marana Rich

I tried WD40 on part of it, and it came off okay.

I brought some Turtle Wax Bug and Tar remover, and that really works good. Comparing results of the two, I did the rest with Turtle Wax. (Black bottle, spray top, with green label.) It says it is safe for all auto finishes, although it does contain petroleum distillates. I sprayed it on, let it sit for a couple of minutes, then rubbed it off (lightly). I immediately washed the area, and commenced to wax everything with Meguiars..... I can't see anything

You have about maybe half as much on yours as I did. Good luck.

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WD-40 was created in 1953 by three technicians at the San Diego Rocket Chemical Company. Its name comes from the project that was to find a "water displacement" compound. They were successful with the fortieth formulation, thus WD-40. The Corvair Company bought it in bulk to protect their Atlas missile parts.

The workers were so pleased with the product, they began smuggling (also known as "shrinkage" or "stealing") it out to use at home. The executives decided there might be a consumer market for it and put it in aerosol cans.

The rest, as they say, is history.

It is a carefully guarded recipe known only to four people. Only one of them is the "brew master." There are about 2.5 million gallons of the stuff manufactured each year. It gets its distinctive smell! from a fragrance that is added to the brew.

Ken East (one of the original founders) says there is nothing in WD-40 that would hurt you. You can use it on foodstuff handling surfaces.

Then try it on your stovetop... Voila! It's now shinier than it's ever been. You'll be amazed.

Here are some of the uses:

-Protects silver from tarnishing.

-Cleans and lubricates guitar strings.

-Gives floors that 'just-waxed' sheen without making it slippery.

-Keeps flies off cows.

-It kills spiders and ant almost instantly.

-Use it for fire ant bites. It takes the sting away immediately and stops the itch.

-Restores and cleans chalkboards.

-Removes lipstick stains.

-Loosens stubborn zippers.

-Untangles jewelry chains.

-Removes stains from stainless steel sinks.

-Removes dirt and grime from the barbecue grill.

-Keeps ceramic/terra cotta garden pots from oxidizing.

-Removes tomato stains from clothing.

-Keeps glass shower doors free of water spots. If yours is plastic, it works just as well as glass.

-Camouflages scratches in ceramic and marble floors.

-Keeps scissors working smoothly.

-Lubricates noisy door hinges on vehicles and doors in homes.

-Gives a children's play gym slide a shine for a super fast slide.

-Lubricates gear shift and mower deck lever for ease of handling on riding mowers.

-Rids kids rocking chairs and swings of squeaky noises.

-Lubricates tracks in sticking home windows and makes them easier to open.

-Spraying an umbrella stem makes it easier to open and close.

-Restores and cleans padded leather dashboards in vehicles, as well as vinyl bumpers.

-Restores and cleans roof racks on vehicles.

-Lubricates and stops squeaks in electric fans.

-Lubricates wheel sprockets on tricycles, wagons, and bicycles for easy handling.

-Lubricates fan belts on washers and dryers and keeps them running smoothly.

-Keeps rust from forming on saws and saw blades, and other tools.

-Removes splattered grease on stove.

-Keeps bathroom mirror from fogging.

-Lubricates prosthetic limbs.

-Keeps pigeons off the balcony (they hate the smell).

-Removes all traces of duct tape.

-Florida's favorite use is, "cleans and removes love bugs from grills and bumpers."

-The favorite use in the state of New York - WD-40 protects The Statue of Liberty from the elements.

-WD-40 attracts fish. Spray a LITTLE on live bait or lures and you will be catching the big one in no time. Also, it's a lot cheaper than the chemical attractants that are made for just that purpose. Keep in mind though, using some chemical laced baits or lures for fishing are not allowed in some states.

-WD-40 is great for removing crayon from walls. Spray on the mark and wipe with a clean rag.

-Also, if you've discovered that your teenage daughter has washed and dried a tube of lipstick with a load of laundry, saturate the lipstick spots with D-40 and re-wash. Presto! Lipstick is gone!

-If you sprayed WD-40 on the distributor cap, it would displace the moisture and allow the car to start.

-It removes black scuff marks from the kitchen floor!

-Use WD-40 for those nasty tar and scuff marks on flooring. It doesn't seem to harm the finish and you won't have to scrub nearly as hard to get them off.

-Bug guts will eat away the finish on your car if not removed quickly! Use WD-40!

P. S. The basic ingredient is FISH OIL

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You have about maybe half as much on yours as I did. Good luck.

You can't see the front wheel in the photo. :huh

Got up on the door too. :ack

Thanks for the :nopity , ....and the fabulous fish oil debate. :crazy

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Marana Rich

Oh BTW, I decided to clean my other car (05 Silver Grand Caravan) with the Turtle Wax since I had accumulated mucho tar from driving on I-8/I-10. It did a great job. I have bum shoulders so I am not into rubbing too much too hard. Black tar really shows up ugly on silver.

I have heard a rumor of another use for WD40, and that is to rub it into the creaky joints of us humans. Don't think I am ready for that one although since it is mainly fish oil, it should work?

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Yes and you may not believe this but........some elderly people who suffer from arthritis (such as hands, elbow, etc) spray it on and rub it in like a cream. I've never used it (don't have arthritis yet) but some people swear by it. And that's no :bs

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