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So you think your job is tough....


Eddie44
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What exactly do they do?

And that's one helluva chopper pilot to hold it that steady. :clap

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There isn't enough money on earth to get me to do that..........

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I seen something like that on discovery channel before. They get paid some big bucks. Man it is bad news I think if they forget to take the static away from the chopper first.

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There is only 3 things that I am afraid of... Electricity, heights, and women.... and im married too... that is awesome...

If you see me on a line like that call the cops... cause I'm there against my will.

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Robert and Elizabeth

That is some amazing video. I am guessing his job is to inspect the lines for any breakdown/potential problems. I so would not do that job! I am scared of heights, electricity, spiders and elevators (it is the height thing with elevators).

E~

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Desertdawg

I've worked 2300 hot before, but we do it on a set of hooks, no helimaflopters here... :willy

Most of our power is 550ac, but I have a couple of sections that are 2300ac

When your standing on a pole with hooks, you can't work the wires like they do, so we have high voltage gloves. You have a set of inner rubber gloves that are tested and a set of outer leathers with cuffs that go almost to the elbow.

Working the lines hot is really easy, you just have to STOP and THINK about every move you make. :toetap

The worst I've gotten bit by was 550 one time from my hand to my elbow, I was pulling the line to the pin to tie it off, it slipped while I had ahold of it, and it pulled my arm into the second leg of the circuit. :chris

I had some electrical burns on my palm from it, and a a few extra heart beats for a couple of hours. I won't ever do that stupid move again :banghead

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I've worked 2300 hot before, but we do it on a set of hooks, no helimaflopters here... :willy

Most of our power is 550ac, but I have a couple of sections that are 2300ac

When your standing on a pole with hooks, you can't work the wires like they do, so we have high voltage gloves. You have a set of inner rubber gloves that are tested and a set of outer leathers with cuffs that go almost to the elbow.

Working the lines hot is really easy, you just have to STOP and THINK about every move you make. :toetap

The worst I've gotten bit by was 550 one time from my hand to my elbow, I was pulling the line to the pin to tie it off, it slipped while I had ahold of it, and it pulled my arm into the second leg of the circuit. :chris

I had some electrical burns on my palm from it, and a a few extra heart beats for a couple of hours. I won't ever do that stupid move again :banghead

Wow, Dawg, good story...I think you left out that you had to do some "heavy duty" cleaning of your shorts....be careful out there...

The most dangerous part of my job is dodging 18 wheel truckers on I-10 on the way to clients.

Dan C.

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I've worked 2300 hot before, but we do it on a set of hooks, no helimaflopters here... :willy

Most of our power is 550ac, but I have a couple of sections that are 2300ac

When your standing on a pole with hooks, you can't work the wires like they do, so we have high voltage gloves. You have a set of inner rubber gloves that are tested and a set of outer leathers with cuffs that go almost to the elbow.

Working the lines hot is really easy, you just have to STOP and THINK about every move you make. :toetap

The worst I've gotten bit by was 550 one time from my hand to my elbow, I was pulling the line to the pin to tie it off, it slipped while I had ahold of it, and it pulled my arm into the second leg of the circuit. :chris

I had some electrical burns on my palm from it, and a a few extra heart beats for a couple of hours. I won't ever do that stupid move again :banghead

Kinda splains some other things about you too Dawg! I think all that juice exited out the top :lol:lol

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Panda GateDefender

Access to page denied

I'm at my suck job and can't view page :lol

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That was cool.....Kinda like marriage one slip and your dead.

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Guest Kens06

And to think people worry about living under high power lines and the effects that has on their bodies??

Dwayne, I'm not calling you out bro, but where do you come up with 550V AC??

I've only been an electrician for 30+ years and I know 4160-2300-1340, then we get to reasonable levels I work with, 480-277-240-208-120!!

The voltage depends on the transformer configuration, Delta or Wye!!

Any one of which can kill you!

The deciding factor is the path through the body and how healthy your heart may be!!

Ken

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Guest UVETTYA

110 AC X 5 = 550?

Maybe it's DC?

I think odd configurations are possible. I work with equipment supplied with 380VAC Ken. Ion implanters as big as your living room, which are your basic atomic particle accelerator, and will run up to 3MEV (that's 3 million electron volts) at 200 amps. You have to approach the terminal, after shutting it down, with a 4 foot discharge pole that looks like a shepherds hook on one end and has a ½" braided, insulated copper wire attached to ground at the other end and you have to touch the terminal with the hook to discharge any residual energy before you can enter.

I left the terminal energized once, to see how close I had to get with the discharge pole to draw an arc, and the rule is correct - about one inch for every 10,000 volts. It's kinda scary drawing a 10" arc but cool at the same time. You all can come by next time and I'll let you hold my free hand. :yesnod

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Guest Kens06
110 AC X 5 = 550?

Maybe it's DC?

I think odd configurations are possible. I work with equipment supplied with 380VAC Ken. Ion implanters as big as your living room, which are your basic atomic particle accelerator, and will run up to 3MEV (that's 3 million electron volts) at 200 amps. You have to approach the terminal, after shutting it down, with a 4 foot discharge pole that looks like a shepherds hook on one end and has a ½" braided, insulated copper wire attached to ground at the other end and you have to touch the terminal with the hook to discharge any residual energy before you can enter.

I left the terminal energized once, to see how close I had to get with the discharge pole to draw an arc, and the rule is correct - about one inch for every 10,000 volts. It's kinda scary drawing a 10" arc but cool at the same time. You all can come by next time and I'll let you hold my free hand. :yesnod

Steve, put your Fluke into an outlet anywhere in your house and if you have any voltage under 120 you need to call SRP or APS!!

The Boss works on train line equipment which uses everyday pole line voltages!!

380 is a euro voltage that can be achieved by changing taps in the transformer, buck-boost transformers or using other voltage regulation hardware!!

Ken

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Now that I'm home and can view... :eek

Oh yeah, don't click the other stuff, not work safe :lol

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Desertdawg
Dwayne, I'm not calling you out bro, but where do you come up with 550V AC??

No prob Ken,

It's actually 600vac, we see enough fluctuation on our lines with the step-up, step-down transformers and the resistance in the dropout fuse holders we use on top of the poles, that by the time it gets to the case it's usually about 550vac. And there's a bunch of locations that we only tap one leg of that to get 220-240vac for the case drops.

We use a multi-tap transformer in the case to get our final 120vac. none of the pole line voltages are critical until after the multi-tap transformer (120vac).

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Guest Kens06
No prob Ken,

It's actually 600vac, we see enough fluctuation on our lines with the step-up, step-down transformers and the resistance in the dropout fuse holders we use on top of the poles, that by the time it gets to the case it's usually about 550vac. And there's a bunch of locations that we only tap one leg of that to get 220-240vac for the case drops.

We use a multi-tap transformer in the case to get our final 120vac. none of the pole line voltages are critical until after the multi-tap transformer (120vac).

OK, that makes sense now!! :thumbs

I see the opposite effect.

Because of the safety factors built into the NFPA 70 National Electrical Code, 120 usually reads 121-124, 277 lighting can be in the lower 280s etc!

Ken

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Desertdawg

Our 120 usually runs from 109 to 99...

Up till now all we ran off of it was battery rectifiers and 10 volt light taps. But now that things are going electronic it's starting to show it's ugly head, at least with the next big upgrade a few years from now they tear it all out and install completely new case's and power services.

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