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Marco can now be licensed


Buccaneer

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Want a new career in a very cool area of aviation? Marco needs to apply. Some of the videos were somewhat interesting and I caught a few errors, but it really depends on which UAV we are talking about and they didn't define that on the presentation. Welcome to my world. :)

http://www.uxvuniversity.com/uav-pilot-training-certificate/

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Marco already has a jib jab users licenses, do you think he really needs one of these.

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Marco needs to apply for job #12, Honeybee ranch hand......

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He can be licensed......like a dog license? That's probably a good thing, society needs this I think. Maybe one of those chips under the skin at the back of the neck for when he gets lost too

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You guys..lol. Hey Tom, there are a lot of these school popping up and who knows I may even start my own school, but as far as certification goes, you are not required to have any and they are not giving commercial licensing out yet...until they do, taking money for commercial aerial work is illeagal. I hear licensing may be real expensive and for sure will require some heavy duty insurance. The way they get around not having a license right now is only charging for the video editing. Just wait, this thing will explode in the next few years.

Now get back to talkin poop about me lol

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You guys..lol. Hey Tom, there are a lot of these school popping up and who knows I may even start my own school, but as far as certification goes, you are not required to have any and they are not giving commercial licensing out yet...until they do, taking money for commercial aerial work is illeagal. I hear licensing may be real expensive and for sure will require some heavy duty insurance. The way they get around not having a license right now is only charging for the video editing. Just wait, this thing will explode in the next few years.

Now get back to talkin poop about me lol

The NSA and homieland security just flagged this thread.

I gave them your personal info.... teh black suburbans will be there shortly...

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That site seems fishy to me.

It's not! A pilot here gave it to me and was also suggested from a GAA guy here, the people that make Preds.

"We are watching you"!

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So with just a handful of hours I could be flying a predator????????

Ahh, no! You only get a training cert which is the start of everything. GAA would have to hire you and train you on either Pred A or Pred B (Reaper) at base X. There is an extensive training program on either one. It would help (a lot) if you were already a pilot. Here is a job along those lines. http://www.neanyinc.com/careers/job/12/uav-pilot-yuma-yuma

BTW, those two UAV's on their site are Global Hawks. A program that the AF is trying to get rid of because of high costs, but awesome A/C. GH does not shoot, real pilots fly Preds and Reapers. LOL or F-16s.

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In a strongly-worded posting on its website, the FAA directly addressed what it called “misconceptions and misinformation about unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) regulations.” It listed seven common myths and set out the underlying facts on each. The myths include that the FAA doesn’t control airspace below 400 feet—it is responsible for all U.S. airspace from the ground up, and said it believes the myth comes from the idea that manned aircraft must generally stay at least 500 feet above the ground; that commercial UAS flights are legal if over private property and under 400 feet—not so, trying to operate a UAS commercially by claiming compliance with Model Aircraft guidelines doesn’t cut it, commercial operations must be approved by the FAA on a case-by-case basis; and that commercial UAS operations fall under a “gray area” of the FARs—again, not so, operating any aircraft in U.S. airspace requires some level of FAA approval.

Other myths busted by the FAA included: There are too many commercial UAS operations for the FAA to stop—the FAA said that it is monitoring them closely, often hears about them via complaint or self-posting on Internet sites and has a number of enforcement tools it is willing to use; commercial UAS operations will be OK after Sept. 30, 2015—again not so, that’s the date the FAA is required to come up with a “safe integration” plan and phase in will be incremental; and that the FAA predicted there will be as many as 30,000 drones by the year 2030—the FAA says that figure is outdated, it currently predicts as many as 7,500 small commercial UAS may be in use by 2018, assuming the necessary regulations are in place.

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